Category Archives: General

Checkout Challenge: Shrink Reduction With No Customer Impact | FutureShop

Checkout Challenge: Shrink Reduction With No Customer Impact

An array of innovative security solutions is paving the way for reducing the incredible shrinking grocery story in a way that has its finger on the pulse of current and future trends, making grocers and retailers alike happy. When considering these security measures, we must do so holistically, with the store design in mind, realizing that it is a cost, a burden, and can cause friction on the shopping experience, but also poses a way out and a way forward.

Shrink reduction in grocery and retail stores has usually been influenced by consumers, and a myriad of factors, among them product type, inventory count, store location and other factors. While loss prevention strategies have helped in the past, the current widely held view is that they’re trending negatively, especially when you factor in frictionless shopping and checkout.

Frictionless checkout, another alternative to store-based surveillance, is the ultimate surveillance state without feeling like cameras are watching your every move. If you’ve visited an Amazon Go store (and others), you have seen this in place, including their “just walk out” technology which is exactly as it sounds. You shop, scan your own items, pay with an app and away you go. But this also comes with risk and that can lead to negative variables like skewed inventory count, theft and more.

Next, factor in facial recognition, which has made significant advancements worldwide, thanks to artificial intelligence and camera networks, but with this innovation comes consumer concerns regarding privacy and what data is being shared through a facial scan.

Steven Duffy, our senior vice president of design, offers four things grocers can do to address the incredible shrinking store.

Transformation Paradoxes graphic

Periodical Highlights Future of Retail

Our Senior Vice President of Design, Steven Duffy, was recently a featured author discussing the future of retail in the October 2021 issue of Retail and Restaurant Facility Business. The article is available in the print and online editions.

In the article, Duffy revealed four ways technology can transform stores by 2030. The following is a quick excerpt from the article:

The future of retail changed forever as the pandemic exposed the inadequacies of eGrocery. Consumers seek convenience at a fair price, and they want a frictionless experience. Grocers and retailers must adapt, and quickly. Retail and grocery formats and their supporting technologies have remained static for decades, unable to respond to shoppers demands, new technologies, and have failed to meet today’s consumer’s shifting paradigm.

Retail of the Future is at an Inflection Point Today

During a recent speaking engagement at the Category Management Association annual conference, we provided clarity on the four future retail themes or paradoxes. Theses are driving the change in how and why we shop and are the connective tissue, the infrastructure behind the transformation of future grocery retailing.

1.) Physical to Virtual: The merging of physical to digital, often called phygital, is how we buy today.

2.) Small is Big: Smaller format is more attractive with technology and convenience playing a part.

3.) Blurring Formats: Retail stores are decreasing in size as restaurant and C-store formats hybridize to include grocery.

4.) Simplify Complexity: Make systems easily accessible enabling a more intuitive and frictionless experience.

Let’s unpack each of these elements that form a base for the rapidly transforming, technology-enabled retail and food-based ecosystem. This overview addresses the retail experience, yet broader and more sweeping changes are necessary across the entire environment and logistics network to facilitate changes moving forward.

To read the entire article, please go here:
https://editions.mydigitalpublication.com/publication/?m=58881&i=726990&p=14&ver=html5

Phygital Ecosystem and the Future of Retail | FutureShop

Phygital Ecosystem and the Future of Retail

Cuhaci Peterson Chief Executive Officer, Greg Simpson, was recently a featured author in the September 2021 issue of Progressive Grocer. The article is available in the print and online editions.

In the article, Simpson offers key considerations in merging physical and digital strategies to obtain the optimal store experience. The following is a quick excerpt from the article:

After 18 months of tremendous change accelerated by an enduring pandemic, the retail industry has reached an inflection point. Expanding and varying customer needs, coupled with re-emerging competition, require new ways of thinking. Or is it an old way of thinking?

The customer is always right, but for that premise to be true, then the future of grocery must be designed for the benefit of the customer, not to coerce them. It’s not the user experience that is changing, but that the customer will change it.

However, to give a better grocery experience requires connecting a series of dots that meet the evolving customer ethos. Grocery must be evaluated across all the channels, forming a network with a new portfolio. Let’s call it Retail Portfolio 2.0 – a concept centered on the entire store portfolio, addressed from the customer point of view. It requires connecting the need, the timing and the delivery method to succeed, but that success only happens when the silos of logistics, store design and construction fade away.

his isn’t a simple process. Retailers often appear just as confused and are divided in attitudes toward innovation, the ability and willingness to make capital investment, and the need to rethink the future store. Over the past two decades, retailers considered only a physical retail portfolio network. Fast-forward to today, and we see a new interconnected environment.

To read the entire article, please go here:

https://progressivegrocer.com/future-retail-phygital-ecosystem

Omni Store | Omnichannel Retail | Design & Development | FutureShop

Future Marketplace: 4 Ways Technology Can Transform Stores By 2030

The future of retail changed forever as the pandemic exposed the inadequacies of eGrocery. Consumers want convenience at a fair price, and they want a frictionless experience. Grocers must adapt, and quickly. They must also ask themselves how their brand will remain relevant in the future marketplace.

In a recent webinar with the Category Management Association, Steven Duffy, Cuhaci and Peterson’s Senior Vice President of Design, offered a unique perspective on the future of small format and technology-enabled retail and how technology, innovation and cultural acceleration transform retail – small formats by 2030.

“Retail of the future is clearly at an inflection point,” Duffy said. “Yet today is the time to harness future retail themes,” he added.

Duffy noted the following four paradoxes will drive retail transformation:

1.) Physical to Virtual: The merging of physical to digital, often called phygital, is how we buy.

2.) Small is Big: Smaller format is more attractive with technology and convenience playing a part.

3.) Blurring Formats: Retail stores are decreasing in size as work from home shifts store sales.

4.) Simplify Complexity: Make systems easily accessible and easy to use.

Successful adoption of these themes requires a few things to drive engagement. Get these tips and learn how the consumer and retailer can benefit by watching the webinar at futureshop.c-p.com/futureshop-videos/.

About Cuhaci & Peterson

Cuhaci & Peterson is a nationally recognized architecture, engineering and planning firm specializing in end-to-end commercial design solutions. Headquartered in Central Florida, the firm has representatives throughout the U.S. and is licensed in 50 states. C&P’s mission of transforming ideas into value is enhanced by a staff of experts who collaborate with clients to translate visions into designs that elevate brands.

The Big Future of Small Grocery Formats: What’s Next? | FutureShop

The Big Future of Small Grocery Formats: What’s Next?

With the advent of a new year and decade, there is no better time to address the topic of format as grocers continue to gravitate toward smaller store sizes, an accelerating trend.

 

As the stage is set for what’s next, during 2020, we experienced an increased preparation of meals at home, reaffirming grocers’ place in our lives. As we head into 2021, grocers strive to smartly implement planning from both an omni retailing stance, influencing the types of stores and how they are networked.

 

In this month’s issue of Progressive Grocer, our Steven Duffy gives a detailed look at the big future of small formats. His insight and the three key takeaways may surprise you. To learn more, simply click here. You may also download the full digital edition by clicking here.
Small Grocery Formats

About Cuhaci & Peterson
Cuhaci & Peterson is a national architecture, engineering and planning firm specializing in end-to-end commercial design solutions. The Orlando-based company is licensed in 49 states.